Tag Archives: Guinevere

Chapter Thirty – Four: The Airport

2 Mar
BTW when you are done reading this chapter. If you think thinking is fun; if you think philosophy should be for everyone try reading  TheMapThinker.com

BTW when you are done reading this chapter. If you think thinking is fun; if you think philosophy should be for everyone try reading TheMapThinker.com

 

 

They had already checked their bags. They were already standing in line to be boarded. When L C Looked up she saw two police, one man, one woman, jostling through the crowd.

The man looked familiar.

“Wonder why Lance is here?” asked Mrs. Langlin.

“Looks like he has a new partner,” commented her husband. “An improvement over the last one.”

As they drew closer L C Recognized the policeman. It was the same man she met, out of uniform, in front of Sternhouser’s market, the day she got the job of nanny. As he came up to them she smiled at him. He did not return it.

“Hello, Lance. What brings you here? And who is your partner?” asked Mrs. Langlin.

“Good afternoon, Mrs. Langlin. Mr. Langlin.” Morgan said with a formality that elicited a raised eyebrow from Mr. Langlin and a pinched frown from Mrs. Langlin.

He turned to L C “Are you Lindsey Carol Davenport?”

“Well, uh, you know I am.”

“You are under arrest. Please place your hands behind your back so my partner can handcuff you so we make as little a scene as possible.”

The words at first did not make sense to her. She had to replay them again in her mind slowly. She was being arrested. Here at the airport.

“Stop. Wait a minute. I’ve done nothing. What am I under arrest for?”

“What is she under arrest for?” asked Mr. Langlin curiously as though a very interesting idea had just struck him.

Morgan spoke politely but firmly. “That is not my concern. My job is to arrest her. She will be charged at the station.”

“My.” Said Mr. Langlin thoughtfully. “That sounds ominous.”

Morgan turned to L C “You will put your hands behind your back now and allow my partner to handcuff you or she will throw you down to the ground and handcuff you the hard way.”

L C Began to cry. Her chest heaved.

Guinevere started to run to L C.  Mrs. Langlin grabbed her daughter and pulled her close.

Delavera stepped up behind L C. Grabbed her unresisting hands one by one, pulled them behind her back, and handcuffed her firmly.

Mr. Langlin told her, “Say nothing to anyone until the lawyer gets there.” He started tapping his cell phone.

As L C Was being led away she looked back through bleary, teared eyes. She saw the Langlins, Bixby, Missy Mousey, and Guinevere, disappearing into the tunnel to the plane. Mr. Langlin was closing his phone, having put it in airplane mode.

 

 

 

© 2014  All Rights Reserved

 

Chapter Twenty – One: Born To Nanny

26 Oct
BTW when you are done reading this chapter. If you think thinking is fun; if you think philosophy should be for everyone try reading  TheMapThinker.com

Much of the hectic times are over. Dad gets weekends off now. Mom’s health is improving. We should be back on track, a blog a week, as promised.

Until L C worked for the Langlins she had no idea the rich are, in many ways, different from other people. That those who were rich belonged to a culture with its own history, traditions, and requirements, not all of which had to do with money. Etiquette, especially table manners, and good English played a far larger role than she would have imagined.

Nor did she realize that when she became a nanny she was joining a culture with a long history of being entwined with the rich. The Langlins traveled to Europe and other continents on a regular basis. There were times when she, and her young charge, would eat in the company of friends and associates of the Langlins. It was important that neither she, nor Guinevere, embarrass them with their behavior or table manners.

Until she took this job L C thought her table manners were acceptable anywhere. She knew which fork to use, and when to use it, she did not belch at the table, nor did she rest her elbows upon it. Now she was learning with a shock that the “Proper Etiquette” she had learned was in fact “American Behavior” and was not acceptable all over the world.

There are places in the world, even the United States, where you DO belch at the table if you are complimenting the cook on a job well done, and places where you not only rest your elbows on the table but you place them at a forty-five degree angle. Places where you eat everything with the three fingers of the right hand and places where you use a knife and fork to eat your good morning toast and marmalade. And in every one of these places the manners of the rich were slightly different from the manners of the poor.

While first impressions are of lasting importance and often determine how people think of you, how you act and how you speak at the table determine how you will be treated.

As nanny it was L C’s job, not only to know these things, but to pass them on to the future world traveler, Guinevere.

Now she understood why the former nanny hated her so much. The days were long gone when a rich person would pick a poor jobless girl up off the street and give them the job of caring for their child. Now days nannies went to school, got degrees, trained, and joined professional organizations.

They might not all be perfect people, and their reasons for becoming a nanny might not have much to do with children, but they had worked for and earned the right to be a nanny.

L C had not.

One day, on the spur of the moment, L C asked Mrs. Langlin about it. Mrs. Langlin smiled, and nodded thoughtfully. “It is true. Most nannies nowadays go to school and learn their profession just as a dental technician does. However they learn things everyone can learn. Few are born to it.”

“How can you be born to the job of nanny?” L C’s half giggle, half chuckle, exhibited the uncertainty she felt. She had never thought of herself as being “born” to anything. She had simply had the good luck to be born into a normal middle class household and grew up in a normal middle class way. Unlike some of her cousins who grew up with far less. Or at least this is what she had always thought.

“Thanks to your mother’s determination, and your great grand parents willingness to pay for it, you are accomplished in ballet, acrobatics, tumbling, and piano.”

L C almost blurted, but then stopped herself. It had not been her great grand parents who had paid for anything. It had been her step father. And he had harped on how much he had done for her every day of her life. Until she could not think of him without hearing his voice telling her how much he had done for her and how grateful she should be. He seldom mentioned how worthless her real father was, but it was always behind his voice. She stopped herself. Mrs. Langlin was so nice L C could not bring herself to correct her, nor could she rant about her personal problems with her step father to her boss. It was, after all, unladylike. Instead she replied:

“Accomplished, yes, but hardly a world-class olympic champion in any of them.”

“A lady would not be. Pushing for an olympic champion is something people who are striving to become something would do. A world-class lady strives to have grace and poise. Just as you learned everything you would need to know to be a beauty queen. You know how to walk down the runway, you know how to sit on a chair properly. You are quite pretty. You could win, you know.” Mrs. Langlin’s voice had been gentle. Now it had a hint of amusement. “Has anyone every suggested, or have you ever thought of entering a beauty contest?”

“Well… Well… No.”

“How far can you walk, in a pair of high heels, with a book on your head?”

“All day if I want.”

“You see. Other people strive to prove they are as good as your birth right. All you have to do is live up to it.” Mrs. Langlin’s smile was as bright as a rainbow.

“I see,” said L C but she really didn’t. She was trying to understand and it showed.

“L C” Mrs. Langlin’s tone was kindly, “You can teach Eliza Doolittle to walk down the stairs gracefully, but if she falls she falls. It is sad to see. Once you’ve taken ballet no one has to teach you to walk down the stairs, and if you fall, you will do it so gracefully everyone will applaud.”

The reference to Eliza Doolittle went unnoticed by L C. Nor did she consider that her cousin, who also had not gone to college, and was not planning on going, would not have recognized the name. But every young lady in the Langlin’s social circle would.

“She has an instructor to teach her ballet.”

“True. But she has no one to teach her to love it. She adores you, and you should have heard her go on about the two of you dancing Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.”

“I was unaware you knew I studied ballet and piano.”

“My husband and I have to know everything there is to know about everyone we associate with. You acquire a million dollars and half the state sees you as a money tree. They have one thought on their mind. That is to cheat you out of it. You acquire a billion dollars and half the world sees you as a money tree for them to pick at.”

“I see,” L C said, and this time she understood.

© 2013 All Rights Reserved

Chapter Eighteen: Dick Van Dyke

26 Jul
BTW when you are done reading this chapter. If you think thinking is fun; if you think philosophy should be for everyone try reading  TheMapThinker.com

Mother is out of the hospital and doing well. 

L C loved the big play room with the huge T.V. and matted floor. She and Guinevere were watching Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and dancing all the outlandish moves Dick Van Dyke executed so well. L C had not danced in months and it felt good to stretch her muscles again.

The room had a well tuned piano in one corner and the two of them, child and nanny, played a duet. Afterwards they complimented each other on what fine jobs they had done.

Later they spread bean bags around the room. Chasing each other, chasing Rocko, Rocko chasing them, jumping and tumbling over the bean bags until they were all three tired.

Then it was dinner time.

(C) 2013, All Rights Reserved

Chapter Ten: Trevor

1 Jun
BTW when you are done reading this chapter. If you think thinking is fun; if you think philosophy should be for everyone try reading  TheMapThinker.com

BTW when you are done reading this chapter. If you think thinking is fun; if you think philosophy should be for everyone try reading TheMapThinker.com

Now. Last weekend. Nathaniel had popped the question. She could not believe she was already engaged to be married to a man she was sure was her dream come true. He was good-looking, confident, gracious, steeped in social skills and was content with L C Just as she was. Not to mention financially he was well off with a promising future. They would have their own children.

L C had been cruising by the vegetables looking at cucumbers and chives when Trevor came smiling around the corner. He had the look of a man who was either once very skinny and just starting to put on weight, or who was once heavy and was just about to become thin.

His grin was the quietly self-assured grin of a man who never met anyone who wasn’t his instant friend. It was easy to tell why. Other men would have chosen this opportunity to make sexually loaded comments about the cucumber she was holding. How that would be received would depend on the woman and her mood.

Trevor did not. Instead he picked up a gourd with an outrageously crooked neck and started telling her all the things she could do with it once she was the proud owner. Using his apron with the store emblem proudly emblazoned on it he showed her how it would make a great-coat rack. Hanging it from his thumb he showed her what an excellent bird house it would make. Grasping its crook and swinging it jauntily he demonstrated bashing in the heads of unwanted intruders. And if she felt inclined to want to keep this precious gem with her she could make a hole in the bottom and wear it for a hat. He did a small pirouette with it sitting on top of his head.

Not to mention when she had finished it would make a great edible and was easily cooked to taste.

She was having the greatest fun when she looked up and saw Raymond staring at them. He was down near the far end of the store, near the liquor aisle. At first she thought something must be terribly wrong.

Quickly she excused herself from Trevor. When she turned back Raymond was nowhere to be found. He was no longer in the store.

Later when she had called him on the phone Raymond said nothing was wrong, he was just tired and would she go out with him come Friday. She begged off saying this weekend the Langlins had planned a trip to the zoo and she was expected to escort Guinevere.

“When you marry me, L C You won’t have to work. I won’t allow it.”

“I like to work. I like being a nanny.”

“Taking care of our children will be a full-time job.”

Suddenly L C knew she could not, and would never, marry Raymond. Now she was angry with herself for not having told Raymond right away she was interested in someone else. Yet she could not figure out how to tell him now.

The next time she went in Stanhouser’s Market everyone was polite to her. No one was friendly. The men called her “Ma’am” When she asked about Trevor she was told “He doesn’t work here any more.” and nothing else.

When she asked Raymond he answered with a question, “Why would you concern yourself about him?”

 

 

© 2013 All Rights Reserved

Chapter Eight: The Proposal

18 May
BTW when you are done reading this chapter. If you think thinking is fun; if you think philosophy should be for everyone try reading  TheMapThinker.com

Thank you to everyone who is following us.

L C went out with Raymond Stanhouser a couple of times. It was okay. Kind of fun but not romantic or exciting. The biggest thing was she decided she did not want to start out life as a full time mother.

Guinevere was at a fun age. Everything was new and over flowing with excitement. Watching a caterpillar crawl across a leaf was a wonderful adventure. Nothing was trite, dull, or boring. Learning the difference between friendly bugs you could hold in your hand and unfriendly bugs that bit opened up a new world.

Stanhouser’s children were beyond all of that. They were dealing with grades and sports and school and friends. Butterflies were “uh huh.” Trees were so many cords of wood, lawns were to be mowed on weekends if they could not escape doing it altogether.

Guinevere and Rocko, L C’s gold and white chihuahua, were playmates. L C took care of both of them. Stanhouser’s children were at an age when they wanted to “own” a dog, but did not want to take the time to feed it.

L C was not ready to see herself as a soccer mom. It was not a bad future to look forward too, at twenty-five or thirty it might be a lot of fun. But not at twenty.

Still Raymond never asked her directly. And, although she knew he wanted more than just a one night stand or a current girlfriend, he never told her how he felt about her or what he wanted. Had he made it clear she might not have dated anyone else. She might have committed herself to his future. But he did not.

When Nathaniel asked her out she did not hesitate. He was closer to her own age and had just entered a  high-tech career as a digital marketing agent with a promising future.

When Nathaniel was with her she was his entire world. No cell phones, no meetings, for the time they were together he was hers. That was so nice.

It was as though her taking a profound interest in Nathaniel was the trigger that caused Raymond to pour out his hopes and desires for their future. The day after she began thinking of herself and Nathaniel as a  couple Raymond came up to her, in the grocery store of all places. In the fruit section, when she was standing in front of apples and oranges, thinking of making a fruit salad. There was no preamble.

“You are the most precious thing in my life. I love you. I want you to marry me. I want you to love my children. I want them to love you.”

It seemed the oddest of times and the oddest of places to make such a confession. It was as though she had been thinking of making fruit salad and now she was being asked to choose between apples and oranges. She couldn’t make the decision. Nor did she feel right about turning him down, telling him she was seeing someone else, in the center of his own grocery store. Something like that should be said on neutral ground. It would not even sound right if it were done in the parking lot.

What she said was, “This is so sudden. I hadn’t… I didn’t… That you liked me that much. I really enjoy being a nanny,” she hedged. ”And I have to spend time thinking about this. I’m not sure I’m ready to be a full-time mommy. I mean I think the world of you, and I don’t know the children that well yet.”

“You will get to know them and they will get to know you. And love you as I do.” He stated.

Later she wondered why she did not just come out and tell him, “I’m seeing someone else and I think it might be serious.” She did not try to answer the question because in her heart of hearts she knew the answer. If something went wrong between her and Nathaniel she wanted to be able to go back to dating Raymond without him feeling she picked him up on the rebound. A subconscious intention she would rather hide from herself.

 

 

© 2013 All Rights Reserved

 

Chapter Five: The Mother

27 Apr
BTW when you are done reading this chapter. If you think thinking is fun; if you think philosophy should be for everyone try reading  TheMapThinker.com

BTW when you are done reading this chapter. If you think thinking is fun; if you think philosophy should be for everyone try reading TheMapThinker.com

When L C looked toward the front of the store she saw Raymond Stanhouser standing, elbows aggressively akimbo, watching everything. He looked handsome and protective standing there. She wondered what he might do were she to be arrested for kidnapping as the nanny hoped.

Mother could be right. Maybe she should go out with him. He had some good points. Unlike her father, he liked dogs. Daddy hated dogs. Never let her have one as a child and after seeing movies like Beverly Hills Chihuahua and Legally Blonde she decided to own one.

She lived with her mother which was fine, she loved her mother. She loved her father too, but since the divorce, her father lived with one bimbo after another. It was painful when she was a teenager and custody was a question. Now she was twenty she did not have to put up with it. She told her father, “You want to see me? Make a date for dinner. I’ll be there.” That was not likely to happen. He would tell her to leave the damn chihuahua at home and she would tell him she never left home without it. Not true, but she had a stubborn streak.

At least her mother found another man and stuck with him. Her stepfather, who never seemed to be able to say a full sentence without throwing in a word about how good he was to her.

Lately she began to think about moving out and living under a bridge. A person can take just so much of being reminded that every bite of food you eat was purchased by someone else’s hard earned dollar.

She did bookwork for “Just Bain Me” where her aunt worked. It was the most prestigious beauty salon in town and busy all the time, but did not require a full time book keeper. It wasn’t a lot, but it was money.

Mrs. Langlin drove up in a car so new it looked like it was still parked on the showroom floor. Guinevere was giggling happily in L C’s embrace. Seeing her mother, Guinevere sprang out of L C’s arms so fast she seemed to fly.

The policeman spoke quietly to Mrs. Langlin who nodded. She told her daughter, “Honey I’m going to have to talk business, okay?”

Guinevere looked around at her nanny, who held her arms out with a huge, loving smile on her face. L C, in a spiteful mood, silently mouthed the name “Zena.” Guinevere smiled and reached for L C and Mrs. Langlin passed her over. As she did so she gave one speculative look from L C to the nanny and back again.

The policeman took Mrs Langlin aside. They spoke softly for several minutes. The nanny acted nervous. L C wondered why they chatted so intently for so long.

When they returned L C looked at Judy Langlin. She had been in the middle of getting her hair done, her hair was blotched as though the color had only half taken. It was a testament to how much she valued her daughter that a woman in her social position would step outside looking like that. Operating on instinct L C said, “You may know my Aunt Emerald. She works for Jessica Bain.”

Mrs. Langlin smiled broadly. “She is the only person besides Jessica I ever allow to touch my hair. And she has that adorable parakeet.” She turned to Guinevere, looking intently into the child’s face, “Why were you running, Honey?”

She pointed to her nanny. “She hates me.” She said quietly.

Within a half hour L C had the job of nanny, was scheduled to take CPR classes, get a passport, and was riding little Guinevere on her shoulders across the parking lot.

 

 

© 2013 All Rights Reserved

 

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ultimatemindsettoday

A great WordPress.com site

Don Charisma

because anything is possible with Charisma

War By Other Means

Politics & Philosophy

this is... The Neighborhood

the Story within the Story

stillness of heart

MUSINGS : CRITICISM : HISTORY : PASSION

The Guilty Preacher Man

abandoned illustrations

matchtall

A tall women amazon model WordPress.com sit

Three Wise Guys

Best not to think about it

Mister G Kids

A daily comic about real stuff little kids say in school. By Matt Gajdoš

Ray Ferrer - Emotion on Canvas

** OFFICIAL Site of Artist Ray Ferrer **

The Judy-Jodie and Kelli Memorial Blog

A great WordPress.com site

A Financial Life Coach

Your Financial Life Coach

Storyshucker

A blog full of humorous and poignant observations.

Dysfunctional Literacy

The world's most entertaining literary blog!

Top 10 of Anything and Everything - The Fun Top Ten Blog

Animals, Gift Ideas, Travel, Books, Recycling Ideas and Many, Many More

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Thoughts

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